Q&A! As schools and universities around the UK prepare to go back to classrooms this week and next, we speak to Callum Morin, captain of the rugby team at London Metropolitan University and a Sports Therapy BSc student about his top tips to prepare.

As schools and universities around the UK prepare to go back to classrooms this week and next, we speak to Callum Morin, captain of the rugby team at London Metropolitan […]

As schools and universities around the UK prepare to go back to classrooms this week and next, we speak to Callum Morin, captain of the rugby team at London Metropolitan University and a Sports Therapy BSc student about his top tips to prepare.

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Hi Callum. You’ve been a Fresher before. Can you tell us your top tips?

I would suggest taking every opportunity to go out as possible, It’s a great time to go out and socialise and make friends for life. It is a bit daunting at first but it will be way worth it come the end of the year when you have a good group of friends that you could possibly be sharing a house with for the next two years. Also attend as many Fresher’s Fairs as possible – you’ve got to love the freebies and sign up for all the student deals such as ‘unidays’ etc. Also, make sure to grab ‘Morrison more’, ‘Tesco clubcard’, ‘co-op’ cards – they can be a huge help with saving money, whether its going for meals, buying clothes or just doing a weekly shop.

What should people do to prepare for university? What kind of things should you take into halls with you?

You definitely need to bring the essentials, such as pots, pans, plates and cooking utensils. I also think that a separate note pad for each module you take is a great way to stay on top of things, especially when it comes to revision. Also as much pens and bedding as you can carry, you can never have enough of either items. And it will put your parents at ease if they visit and see clean sheets on your bed.

Tell us a bit about a typical day at university for you. What does being a Sports Therapy student mean?

My typical day usually consists of an early start with a commute into London, on which I’d listen to music or podcasts which are suggested by our lecturers. Between lectures and practical sessions, I will try and fit a gym session and a bit of lunch. You can’t go wrong with a Tesco meal deal.

You’re currently captain of the rugby team at London Met Uni. Do you think it’s important to get involved in sports at university?

112%, even if you are not super interested in a sport, give it a go because you will find a lovely group of people who will be there to help you out. I personally have made great friends with all the rugby guys and they have played a huge part of my university life. And you never know, it could open doors to paths in your life you never thought of taking.

How do you get the balance right between studying and playing the game?

I mean, study should always come first, however, because I look forward to seeing the guys at training and having a laugh I make sure my work is done before my other commitments. If you have a moment free and you are wondering what to do, grab some uni work and even half an hour’s work can make a huge difference.

Tell us a bit about how you got involved in rugby. Have you played before [if so, which team(s)] or is this something you tried for the first time at London Met?

When I was little I first played football however in high school, I started to notice rugby and it wasn’t until college I started to play rugby. The college I played with was Worthing College. It was there where I began to learn the basics of the sport and get some game time under my belt. Over the course of my two years at college I thoroughly enjoyed the sport and decided to pursue it at university.

What would you say to someone who perhaps wants to give rugby a go at uni but has never tried before?

Firstly I suggest finding contacts of the university side’s coach or captain. They will always be present at the Fresher’s Fairs and normally pretty hard to miss. If you aren’t afraid to get a bit muddy and collect a few scratches along the way, just get stuck in. Everyone in the rugby community is welcoming and friendly and you will soon learn to love the sport like I do.

And finally, what is your favourite thing about the sport?

I absolutely love the sense of camaraderie, there is no better feeling than putting your body on the line with your friends and enjoying a few beers afterwards. From starting the sport I have made great friends and great memories and would never look back.